Understanding the LCAP’s Increased or Improved Services Requirement

By Jennifer Reyes, Ed.D., Educational Support Services Manager

Updated: November, 2023 

California school leaders, are you confused about the LCAP’s increased or improved services requirement?

If so, you’re not alone!  Read on for a breakdown of the basics of this critical LCAP component.

Unduplicated Pupils

To begin, a charter school’s unduplicated count refers to the total number of students who belong to one or more of the groups identified for additional funding under the Local Control Funding Formula (LCFF):  Low Income (measured by Free/Reduced Lunch eligibility), English Learner, and Foster Youth.  Unduplicated simply means that any student in one or more of these groups would only be counted once in the calculation.

The unduplicated pupil count is used to determine the amount of supplemental and concentration funds the charter school will receive under LCFF.  Charter schools receive these additional funds up to a maximum of the unduplicated percentage of the school district in which they reside.

To illustrate, a charter school of 400 students may have a total of 320 unduplicated pupils. This school has 320 students who meet one or more criteria for unduplicated pupils.  Rather than add together the school’s 310 students who are eligible for free/reduced lunch, its 50 English Learners, and its five foster youth, the formula counts each student just once – even those who meet more than one criteria – for a total of 320 of the 400 enrolled students, or an Unduplicated Pupil Percentage (UPP) of 80%.

Alternate UPP Example

Total student population:  4

  • Student 1- Free/Reduced Lunch-eligible
  • Student 2- Free/Reduced Lunch-eligible and English Learner
  • Student 3- Free/Reduced Lunch-eligible and Foster Youth
  • Student 4- Meets no unduplicated pupil criteria

Unduplicated Pupil Count:  3

UPP: ¾=75%

Now, if the district the charter school resides in has an equal or higher UPP, the school will receive funds for its own full count. For example, if your UPP is 80% and the district your school resides in has a UPP of 90%, your UPP will be capped at 80%. However, if the district percentage is lower, the school will receive funding at the district percentage. For example, if your UPP is 80% but the district your school resides in has a UPP of 45%, your UPP will be capped at 45%.

Minimum Proportionality

Minimum proportionality refers to the proportion of supplemental and concentration funds to base funds the school receives. Districts and charter schools are required to state and justify how they have used the supplemental and concentration funds to increase or improve services for the unduplicated student population by at least the proportion of additional funds received.

For example, if a school receives $10,000,000 in total LCFF revenue, and based on its unduplicated student population receives $1,000,000 in supplemental and concentration funding, then its Minimum Proportionality Percentage (MPP) would be 10%.  This school needs to demonstrate how it has increased or improved services for its unduplicated student population, in quantity or quality, by at least ten percent.

MPP Example

All other LCFF Funding (less TIIG & Transportation):  $10,000,000

Supplemental and Concentration Funds: $1,000,000

MPP ($1,000,000/$10,000,000):  10%

How can a charter school best demonstrate that it has increased or improved services for its unduplicated pupils?  In the LCAP, each action or service must be identified as contributing or not contributing to the increased/improved services requirement.  Those contributing actions/services are then identified as being applied school-wide or limited to the unduplicated student population.

Increased or Improved Services Section Requirements

Here are the items a charter school must include in the LCAP under DIISUP:

  • The dollar amount of funds generated by unduplicated students.
  • The Minimum Proportionality Percentage (MPP) reflecting the proportion of funds generated by unduplicated pupils.
  • If enrollment for unduplicated pupils is above 55%, for services that are applied schoolwide, include a description of how the services are principally directed  and effective.  For unduplicated counts below 55%, for services that are applied schoolwide, include a description of how services provided are the most effective use of funds to meet the goals of the unduplicated pupils.  Provide the basis for this determination, any alternatives considered, plus supporting theory, experience, or research.

A complete explanation for schoolwide actions will include: 

  • Needs, conditions, circumstances  
  • Describe the action/service  
  • How the action relates to the needs  
  • Intended outcome for the group of students  
  • How the action will produce the intended outcome 

Concentration Grant Add-On: 

  • Amount and description of how funds will be used to increase staff providing direct services to students. 

Examples of Actions and Services

Some examples we have seen of actions and services targeting unduplicated pupils:

  • Restorative justice and bullying prevention programs  
  • Academic counseling and college preparedness resources
  • Training on how children respond to trauma 
  • Training on social emotional learning and culturally relevant instruction 
  • Mental health services 
  • Intervention programs, mentors, tutors 
  • Methods for differentiating instruction 
  • Arts education, field trips, sports, camps 
  • Connecting families to community resources 

Get Organized and Share Your Great Work!

A charter school or district needs to be able to show, through its LCAP, how it is appropriately utilizing the additional funds received to support unduplicated pupils.  Recent news coverage has spotlighted both charter and district examples where funds are underutilized or unaccounted for in LCAPs.  A March 2023 report by Public Advocates and ACLU Southern California found that 23% of LEAs under-budgeted these funds, and 52% failed to utilize all their funding for high-needs students.  In our experience with schools, there are often many innovative approaches and programs in place to serve unduplicated pupils, and our work together is a matter of organizing the information to meet the LCAP requirements and sharing success stories. 


Our experts are here to help you make the LCAP an actionable tool for your charter school community!

Learn more about EdTec’s LCAP Support Services.

Edtec offers LCAP custom support services tailored to meet your school’s unique needs. Please fill out the form below for information about our LCAP services. One of our experts will be in touch soon!

 

Public Charter Schools Grant Program

Streamline Your PCSGP Grant Application with EdTec

The California Department of Education has announced a request for applications for the Public Charter Schools Grant Program (PCSGP) 2023-24 Start-Up Sub-Grant.

The PCSGP Start-Up Sub-Grant is intended for the planning and implementation of newly established or conversion charter schools who did not begin serving students prior to July 1, 2022, as well as the expansion and replication of high-quality charter schools. Replication and Expansion applicants should note that the 2023–24 PCSGP Start-Up Sub-Grant RFA includes updated high-quality eligibility criteria.

Application Deadline: December 18, 2023

Your Path to PCSGP Funding Starts Here

Securing funding for your school can be a complex and time-consuming process. That’s why we offer expert support for the Public Charter Schools Grant Program (PCSGP) Start-Up Sub-Grant application process.

Proven Success: Our experienced team has a proven history of securing PCSGP funding.
Budget Friendly: We offer flat fees or hourly rates that suit your school’s budget.
Customized Support: Whether you need assistance with the entire writing process or just one step of the process, EdTec has you covered.

Ready to explore how EdTec can be your partner in securing funding for your school? Reach out to our team today to learn more about our support for the PCSGP Start-Up Sub-Grant and discover how we can help your school achieve its funding goals.

Connect with EdTec at the 2023 Charter School Leadership Update!

EdTec is a proud sponsor, exhibitor, and presenter at this week’s 2023 CSDC Conference. Visit us at Booth 304 to say hello to our team and learn how we can support your school with business, operations, and performance services. Don’t forget to check out our sessions. You can learn more below!

Learn More About Our Sessions


Charter School Accountability Summit 

Wednesday, November 8, 9:30 a.m – 4:00 p.m.

ACC North 255C

This Summit reviews fundamentals of charter school accountability, with opportunities to reflect and consider your school’s context.

9:30-11:30AM
Summit Part I: Local Control and Accountability Plans (LCAPs). Each year, every California Local Education Agency (LEA), including charter schools, must prepare or “update” an LCAP. These complex documents attempt to tie fiscal and programmatic plans, with a focus on monitoring effectiveness of actions that aim to close gaps for “high needs” students. “LCAPing” is not always straightforward, but some approaches help to make sense of the process.

Join Kathy Asmussen, Jennifer Reyes, and Annice Weinstein of EdTec for an overview of the LCAP’s purposes, components, and required process elements, including linkage to the charter school’s charter petition and California School Dashboard data. This illuminating presentation will break down what’s new this year and offer valuable tips to make the process purposeful and efficient. Seasoned professionals and beginners alike will gain insights into established best practices. This session will emphasize practical approaches to optimize the LCAP process and drive impactful outcomes for your charter school community.

 

 

Making the ELO Program Work for Your School

Wednesday, November 8, 4:15 p.m. – 5:30 p.m

ACC North 259B

The Expanded Learning Opportunities Program (ELO-P) is a heavily funded priority for the state budget… and it looks like it’s here to stay! Whether you’ve offered afterschool and intersession programming before or not, there is a lot to learn about this program’s requirements and opportunities to strategically implement it in ways that help your school.

Join this session to get a clear and simplified overview of the program requirements (and ideas for how to track them), learn what is going to be audited, review a few sample budgets and a budgeting tool you can use for program planning, and discuss ideas for maximizing the funding and program efficiency. We’ll go over frequently asked questions and talk with a program director. You will come away with tools and ideas to use immediately to get your ELO Program off the ground.

 

 

Improving Recruitment and Building Trust Through Storytelling

Thursday, November 9, 10:45 a.m. – 12:00 p.m.

ACC North 254B

Recruitment is likely top of mind for you day in and day out. But is your brand? Before rushing to execute on marketing and communications tactics, it’s critical to engage your community in the development of brand messaging and visuals that reflect the values of your organization and the needs of your audiences. Even the best tactics fall flat without a compelling story. Students quickly sniff out inauthenticity and are waiting to feel heard and inspired. And the vibrancy of your visuals can make or break a good first impression.

Join the Friday, EdTec, and John Muir Charter Schools teams to explore the importance of an inspiring brand for student recruitment, learn how to build trust through storytelling, and review examples of charter school brands that provide the foundation for more effective marketing and communications efforts.

 

 

Connect with EdTec at the 2023 California Charter Schools Conference!

EdTec is excited to be a sponsor, exhibitor, and presenter at the 2023 California Charter Schools Conference! The conference takes place in Sacramento from March 13-16, 2023. EdTec staff, along with our partner organizations and partner schools, will present five breakout sessions, as well as one session at the virtual School Developer Summit.

We invite you to stop by Booth 501 to learn more about our services and solutions for charter schools. At EdTec, we are committed to providing high-quality support and resources to charter schools, and we look forward to connecting with charter school leaders at this year’s conference.

Because everyone can always use a new headshot, EdTec is the Headshot Bar sponsor this year! The Headshot Bar will be set up at the back of the exhibit hall in the right corner during exhibit hall hours.

EdTec Breakout Sessions

We believe in providing charter schools with the tools and knowledge they need to succeed. That’s why we’re excited to present five informative breakout sessions! Each session will be led by one of our experienced team members, and attendees will come away with practical strategies for improving their schools. Please see below for session details.

Tuesday, March 14

  • Making the ELO Program Work For Your School | 9:00am – 10:15am
    • The Expanded Learning Opportunities Program is a heavily funded new priority for the state budget… and it looks like it’s here to stay! Join EdTec and two ELO Program directors for a clear, simple overview of the program requirements and recommendations for tracking. Together we will also review sample budgets and a budgeting tool for program planning, and discuss ideas for maximizing the funding and program efficiency. You will come away ready to get your ELO Program off the ground!
  • Making the Connection: How Data Impacts Funding & Accountability | 3:10pm – 4:25pm
    • Data reporting is increasingly at the heart of funding and school accountability determinations. Know what areas you can impact to benefit your school. Learn about the criteria that affect funding calculations and measures of school performance on the Dashboard. We’ll identify pitfalls and areas you can improve through ongoing monitoring and thorough data reporting, and help you start building a smart data strategy to set up your school for success.

Wednesday, March 15

  • Demystifying Financial Statements | 2:00pm – 3:15pm
    • Do you dread the part of the board meeting when it’s time to review and discuss the financial statements? Does it seem as if everyone is speaking another language? We will demystify the fundamentals of accounting and budgeting so you are prepared to effectively engage in financial discussions. We will also review what lenders focus on. Through group exercises, you will acquire the language, analytical tools, and insights needed to confidently evaluate your organization’s fiscal health in today’s uncertain times.
  • What Every Board Member Should Look For: Indicators of Success and Stability | 3:25pm – 4:40pm
    • Now more than ever, charter school board members fulfill a critical function in ensuring the success and survival of charter schools. What are the red flags that signal when a school is in danger –in finance, operations, student achievement? How do we measure success aligned to our mission and vision? What preventative measures help to decrease risk? Our experts will provide recommendations and tools to help board members govern with proactive, consistent, effective oversight.

Thursday, March 16

  • Measuring Success Through the Lens of Renewal | 9:00am – 10:15am
    • Hear from a school leader who has developed an ongoing cycle of evaluating success on multiple measures, aligned to the charter’s mission and with a focus on what matters for renewal. With goals aligned to renewal targets and built into the LCAP, the school has actionable data accessible to inform decisions and engage the school community. Together with EdTec’s data and assessment experts, the school leader will discuss learning experiences, address questions, and share best practices.

We look forward to seeing you at our booths and sessions. We hope everyone has a great conference experience full of learning, networking, and inspiration.

Charter Leader Spotlight Series: Gayle Nadler, Executive Director, Multicultural Learning Center

April 28, 2022

Last month, the Multicultural Learning Center received the California Charter Schools Association’s (CCSA) Hart Vision Award for Charter School of the Year (Southern California). The Hart Vision Awards, established in 1995, are named in honor of Gary K. Hart, the former California State Senator and former California Secretary of Education. The prestigious Hart Vision Awards are given annually to individuals and organizations with outstanding records of leadership and excellence in furthering California’s charter public school movement. The award recognizes​​ the work and achievements of exceptional charter public schools, leaders, and advocates.

We’re proud to work with MLC as a longtime client and admire their steadfast commitment to students and families. As a part of our Charter Leader Spotlight Series, we interviewed Gayle Nadler, the co-founder and Executive Director of MLC, to learn more about MLC, how it feels to receive such a prestigious award, and why developing global citizens is such a critical part of the school’s mission and vision!

 

EdTec: How does it feel to be the winner of the CCSA Hart Vision Award  for Charter School of the Year (Southern California)?

Gayle: It’s an honor to receive an award in Gary Hart’s name. I heard him speak at the CCSA conference many years ago and was inspired by him, the movement he started, and his brave work to get charter schools on the map in California back in 1992. He passed away in January this year, so it’s even a little more heartfelt to receive the award in his name.

I was very excited that receiving the award had to do with not only our growth academically but also our innovative dual immersion program along with our emphasis on developing global competencies in our students.

To be honest, the timing was really incredible, coming out of the two years that we’ve just experienced. To be recognized when we have felt so vulnerable shows the impact of the hard work and determination of our community. It really comes down to who you are as an organization and your values, your team, and your community especially in the toughest of times.

It’s MLC’s time to share what we’re doing, and the outcomes we’re achieving. We’re willing to share all the work that we do so that other schools and students can benefit from what we’ve learned. It’s been 20 years of innovation, creation, development, and making mistakes and fixing them. There’s a lot that we can share with developing charter schools and other organizations.

 

EdTec: Have you ever been approached by other charters for advice?

Gayle: We’re frequently working with other schools on different levels. We’re approached by a lot of developing dual language schools. These schools usually want to hear about how we teach in two languages, what curriculum we use, and where we find bilingual teachers. We’ve also been approached about different things that we do in terms of organizational culture, special programs, instruction, planning, development, and strategy.

MLC is not in this movement for solely our own benefit. We want our school to do well and be successful for the community we serve, but we’re in this movement to improve education for all students, families, and educators in California.

 

EdTec: What has been the most rewarding part of this 21-year journey for you?

Gayle: The thing that always makes me smile most, is our alumni. It’s most rewarding to hear from the alumni in terms of what they’re doing with their lives, how they furthered their education, and the impact MLC has had on who they have become as global, bilingual citizens.

 

EdTec: What has been your most valuable lesson learned over the past 21 years?

Gayle: I say this to new charter leaders all the time, the most valuable lesson you can learn as a charter leader is this: there will always be obstacles – that is the job! Don’t hope or wait for the day there will be smooth sailing because it won’t come! The job is riding the waves and sticking to your vision and mission and the reason you opened in the first place. There’s always going to be challenges in front of you and because your vision and mission is so powerful, you have what it takes to overcome them.

 

EdTec: What is it like working with your mom?

Gayle: For the first eleven years, my mother was the Executive Director and I worked under her as the Program Director. She retired in 2012, so for the last 10 years, I’ve been running the show, although she is on the board and she volunteers in the classrooms. Without her knowledge and powerful ways of making things happen, I don’t know that we would have opened. She got us going, so that I could take the reins one day and take it to the next level.

Honestly, the work is so hard and so demanding, especially in those first 10 years of running a charter school  that you don’t even have time to think about anything else! We definitely had to create boundaries and have very clear delineations – “Okay, am I talking to you as your employee or as your daughter?” So, there was a lot of that in the beginning. We were excited to build something together. It really came from our experiences as mother and daughter when I was in public school. The fact that we took this really deep experience from my childhood, and her experience as my mother, and turned it into something that would fulfill us and the community, is a very powerful thing.

 

EdTec: As a charter school leader, you need a strong support system in place. What kind of support has been key to your success?

Gayle: On the ground, it is having an operational and instructional team that is completely committed to the school, to the vision, to the purpose. You need instructional leadership that is extremely talented and focused on outcomes for students, social, emotional, and academic.  And the operations team must have wide knowledge and experience with facilities, finance, and human resources.

Beyond your staff team, you need partners like EdTec!  Having a strong, trusting relationship with our back-office provider has been essential because it’s such a fluid relationship. Our relationship with EdTec has been essential in overcoming some of those hurdles that we face on the back end of things, so that the school can operate and have all these outstanding outcomes for kids.

Other community partners and the LA philanthropic community play a critical role. And of course, our parents – they know their students best, they are true partners in their education.

It’s also important to allow an opportunity for all folks, whether they’re administrators, teachers, teaching assistants, after school tutors, custodial staff, to have a voice in the organizational operations, policies, procedures. Your supporting community should have a strong voice and a seat at the table where they can express themselves, where they can share ideas, give feedback, make suggestions, and make decisions. The key to having a strong school organization is a collaborative approach in the truest sense. This requires a lot of listening and a lot of empathy on the part of leaders. It takes a lot to create that in an organization, but that’s a key element in our success.

 

EdTec: Why is developing global citizens is so important to you?

Gayle: It’s very important for young people to know how to navigate and live in a world with diverse thinking, diverse backgrounds, diverse cultures and language. For young people to be successful in a diverse world, they must be raised in an environment where they not only are taught to be respectful to people who are different, but to live and breathe and share space each day with people who come from diverse backgrounds. The experience at MLC enables young people to think more critically when they’re adults and to look at all sides of a story, to see different perspectives and points of view. Our students can also speak in more than one language which creates greater compassion and understanding. It’s also about having the confidence and the commitment to create change when it’s necessary. Those are the skills that we’re building when we talk about global citizens.

 

EdTec: What is your vision for the future? What is something you hope to accomplish in the next few years?

Gayle: Right now, we’re working on recovering from the COVID-19 pandemic. I see us bouncing back and getting back into the groove of what we do. Then it’s about what can we do to take us to the next level because we never stop growing. I’d like to see us become more involved in creating change and spreading the word about some of our successful initiatives to influence others and perhaps policy.

I also want to bring in more partners, to engage more folks in the community and perhaps document our work. One of the benefits of being a charter is you’re this little incubator of innovation. But you’re so busy doing it, that you don’t really have time to sit down and document all the wonderful things you’ve done or put it into a guidebook.  It would be great to document some of the things that we’ve done so that it can be more easily shared, studied, or developed to influence equitable access to high quality education for all students.

Thank you to Gayle, and congratulations to the MLC community!

CCSA produced a special video series featuring the exemplary charter school leaders who received the 2022 Hart Vision Award. You can view the MLC video here.

The Multicultural Learning Center (MLC) is a K-8 public charter school in Los Angeles founded in 2001 by mother and daughter team Toby Bornstein and Gayle Nadler with the vision to “bring together a diverse community of learners where cultural and individual differences are the building blocks of academic, social, and intrapersonal success.” MLC achieves this vision through the school-wide implementation of a dual immersion program (Spanish/English) and a focus on global and social-emotional competencies.

Connect with EdTec at the 2022 California Charter Schools Conference!

March 7, 2022

EdTec is excited to be a sponsor, exhibitor, and presenter at the 2022 California Charter Schools Conference! The conference will take place in Long Beach from March 14-17, 2022. EdTec staff, along with our partner organizations and partner schools, will present six breakout sessions, as well as one session at the virtual School Developer Summit. We’re looking forward to this opportunity to share our expertise with charter developers, new schools, and established schools.

Because everyone can always use a new headshot, EdTec is the Headshot Bar sponsor this year! The Headshot Bar will be set up at the back of the exhibit hall in the right corner during exhibit hall hours (Tuesday from 9:00am – 4:30pm, and Wednesday from 9:00am – 4:30pm).

We will have two booth locations in the exhibit hall. We hope you will stop by Booth 1112 to meet the EdTec team and learn more about our charter development and back office services. Our school data and assessment experts will be available at Booth 1515 to discuss how we help charters to create actionable school plans by supporting school leaders with accountability reporting, performance analysis, and educational partner engagement.

EdTec Breakout Sessions

Monday, March 14

Tuesday, March 15

We look forward to seeing you at our booths and sessions, in-person for the first time in three years! We hope everyone has a great conference experience full of learning, networking, and inspiration.

Tune into Education Strategy with EdTec’s Partner, Friday

EdTec’s Jeremy Divinity, a doctoral candidate in Educational Leadership for Social Justice at Loyola Marymount University, was joined by Friday’s Annie Crangle and Dr. Jeffrey Hunt to discuss the power of strategic planning during a crisis in a recent podcast episode titled, “From Crisis Management to Strategic Planning“.

During the podcast episode, Annie and Dr. Hunt talk insights from FORWARD, a recent strategic planning cohort designed to support charter school leaders in developing solid reopening plans grounded in a long-term strategic vision. As partners, EdTec’s experts participated in the cohort by providing school leaders with additional expertise in operations, finance, and student data analytics. In addition, in the podcast episode, Annie and Dr. Hunt emphasize how incorporating student voice from an equity lens through their equity tool, Highlight, positively impacts school planning.

Tune into the episode now by listening below!   

Disclaimer: This podcast is not sponsored by any outside organizations and was recorded as part of a project for a program of study.

Do you need guidance generating a new strategic plan in today’s rapidly changing environment? Don’t worry, as Friday is launching more cohorts this fall!  Sign up here to stay informed. 

Connect with EdTec at the California Charter Schools Virtual Conference!

(This post has been updated to include links to the session recordings that are only accessible to conference attendees.) 

March 2, 2021

EdTec is proud to be a sponsor, exhibitor, and presenter at the California Charter Schools Virtual Conference! The conference is scheduled for March 15-19, 2021. EdTec staff, along with our partner organizations and partner schools, will present 10 breakout sessions, as well as participate in the School Developer Summit and present during the Solutions Hour. We’re looking forward to this opportunity to share our expertise and connect with charter leaders across the state.

On Tuesday, March 16 at 11am, as part of the Solutions Hour, EdTec will open up its monthly, clients-only Leadership Hour series to all conference attendees! Our school finance and accountability experts will provide updates on current issues impacting California charter schools, including the 2021-22 State Budget proposal and related legislation. We’ll also provide guidance on the Local Indicators and 2021-24 LCAP development, preparing you to align your goals, set reasonable metrics, and track expenditures.

We also hope you will visit our booth in the Virtual Exhibit Hall to meet the EdTec team and learn more about our services.  We’ll be available everyday during exhibit hall hours to meet one-on-one to discuss how we can support your school with new charter petitions, back office, CALPADS,  student achievement analyses, the LCAP, licensing for learning management solutions, charter renewal, grant writing, and more.

EdTec Breakout Sessions

Monday, March 15

Tuesday, March 16

Wednesday, March 17

Thursday, March 18

Friday, March 19

 

EdTec Booth Demos

Monday, March 15 

  • Introduction to Otus — Data, Assessment, and Learning Management System | 1:00pm – 1:30pm
    • EdTec will showcase Otus, an affordable K-12 learning platform designed to streamline the process of using data to improve learning. Combined with EdTec’s charter-specific support, Otus is the ideal solution for charter schools striving for a data-driven, equity-focused school culture in a distanced-, hybrid, or in-person learning environment.

Wednesday, March 17

  • Introduction to Otus — Data, Assessment, and Learning Management System | 1:00pm – 1:30pm
    • EdTec will showcase Otus, an affordable K-12 learning platform designed to streamline the process of using data to improve learning. Combined with EdTec’s charter-specific support, Otus is the ideal solution for charter schools striving for a data-driven, equity-focused school culture in a distanced-, hybrid, or in-person learning environment.

Thursday, March 18

  • Introduction to Otus — Data, Assessment, and Learning Management System | 10:00am – 10:30am
    • EdTec will showcase Otus, an affordable K-12 learning platform designed to streamline the process of using data to improve learning. Combined with EdTec’s charter-specific support, Otus is the ideal solution for charter schools striving for a data-driven, equity-focused school culture in a distanced-, hybrid, or in-person learning environment.

Friday, March 19

  • Verified Data from National Student Clearinghouse | 10:00am – 10:30am
    • EdTec has partnered with National Student Clearinghouse® to provide verified data for charters on their graduates’ college enrollment, persistence, and completion status. EdTec makes the StudentTracker® data process simple and provides key reports to support your LCAP and renewal.

We look forward to connecting at our sessions, during our booth demos, and in the exhibit hall. We hope everyone has an informative and fun conference experience!

Every Student Succeeds Act

What California Charter Leaders Need to Know About Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA) Assistance

By Annice Weinstein, Senior Manager, Assessment Data & Analysis

February 18, 2020

The California Department of Education (CDE) just released the list of schools that qualify for Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA) assistance based on the 2019 CA School Dashboard. All schools in California qualify for either General Assistance, Comprehensive Support and Improvement (CSI), or Additional Targeted Support and Improvement (ATSI). General Assistance is the standard assistance that every school receives, so we’ll focus on CSI and ATSI.

So, how does a school get identified for CSI?

California uses the CA School Dashboard to determine eligibility for CSI based on two categories of schools. The criteria for CSI are based on the performance of “All Students.” The categories are:

  1. Schools with a low graduation rate: High schools with a four- and five-year graduation rate of less than 68% averaged over two years; applies to high schools regardless of whether they receive Title I funds.
  2. Lowest-performing Title I schools (based on 2019 CA School Dashboard and Title I funds for the 2018-19 school year):
    • School with all red indicators
    • Schools with all red but one indicator of another color
    • Schools with all red and orange indicators
    • Schools with five or more indicators where the majority are red
    • Note: For 2019, an English Language Progress Indicator (ELPI) Status level of “Very Low” will be used as a proxy for “Red” in CSI criteria.

Schools can only be eligible for CSI in one of the two categories for a single school year. The criteria apply to Dashboard Alternative School Status (DASS) schools as well. Schools will be evaluated annually to determine continued eligibility for CSI or exit.

What is required of a school identified for CSI?

Schools that meet the criteria for CSI are required to develop and approve a plan for the school to improve student outcomes. That plan must be based on a needs assessment, include evidence-based interventions, and address any resource inequities through the implementation of the plan.

If your school is identified for CSI, you are eligible to receive additional funding to support the implementation of school plans. Eligible schools should log into the Grant Management and Reporting Tool (GMART) to submit their applications before 4 pm on February 28, 2020. The application timeline is short, so make sure you don’t miss out on this extra funding.

CSI charter schools also have additional reporting requirements for the Local Control and Accountability Plan (LCAP). CSI charter schools must complete CSI prompts #2 and #3 in the LCAP Plan Summary that describe the programs and supports implemented, as well as the process for monitoring program effectiveness. These schools will also detail how the CSI funds were used to implement related actions in the LCAP. CSI charters may utilize the LCAP to meet the School Plan for Student Achievement (SPSA) requirement, provided they include evidence-based interventions in the “Actions” and the “Increased and Improved Services” sections of the LCAP.

How does a school get identified for ATSI?

The criteria for ATSI is based on the performance of student groups. Even if your indicators for “All Students” look good on the Dashboard, you can still qualify for ATSI based on your student group performance.

Schools that are not eligible for CSI can qualify for ATSI if they have one or more student group(s) that for two consecutive years (example: 2018 AND 2019), meet(s) the criteria listed above for “CSI-Lowest performing schools.”

The same student group would have to meet the criteria in both years, although the group may meet the criteria based on different color combinations in each of the two years. The school does not need to receive Title I funds to be eligible for ATSI. Schools identified for ATSI do not receive any additional federal funds for support.

How do I know if my school was identified for CSI or ATSI?

To see if your charter was identified for CSI or ATSI this year, click here. The list only shows charter schools identified for CSI or ATSI. If your school isn’t on the list, it only qualifies for General Assistance.

CA Testing Participation Rates

What California Charter Leaders Need to Know About Testing Participation Rates

By Annice Weinstein, Senior Manager, Assessment Data & Analysis

January 15, 2020

EdTec’s data specialists put together a tool that makes it easy for any school to check their 2019 participation rates. Click here to review your 2019 participation rates for ELA and math, schoolwide and for each student group.

In Spring 2020, the testing participation rate will matter more than ever for the Dashboard. Check out our recent blog post to learn why.

So, who counts towards the participation rate calculation?

The federal Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA) requires all California schools (including charters and Dashboard Alternative School Status, or DASS, schools) to test at least 95 percent of all students and student groups in English Language Arts (ELA) and mathematics, and to factor the participation rate into California’s accountability system, the CA School Dashboard. The calculation includes students tested on Smarter Balanced (SBAC) Summative Assessments as well as the CA Alternate Assessments (CAAs) in ELA and mathematics. Students must take both the computer adaptive test (CAT) and performance task (PT) sections to count as participating. The rates are calculated separately for each subject area. The CA Science Test (CAST) is not currently included on the Dashboard, but participation rate will be calculated for the CAST as well.

All schools that serve students in grades three through eight and eleven are responsible for meeting the 95 percent participation rate, both schoolwide and for all student groups with at least 11 students. Even though only groups with 30 or more students receive a color designation on the Dashboard, groups with at least 11 continuously enrolled students will have Status data reported on the Dashboard, and the participation rate will impact the Distance from Standard (DFS) for those groups.

How is the participation rate calculated?

Although the DFS for the Dashboard is calculated based on students continuously enrolled since census day, the participation rate is based on the number of students enrolled during the testing window. The participation rate penalty is applied after the initial DFS average is calculated.

The following students are removed from the participation rate:

  • Medical emergency: Students absent from testing due to a significant medical emergency and flagged with a medical emergency condition code on the CAASPP file
  • English learners new to the country (enrolled after April 15 of the prior school year) are exempt from the ELA portion only. They are still required to take the Math assessment.

Parent waivers DO NOT EXEMPT students from the participation rate.

 

Formula for Participation Rate*

Total number of students tested (SBAC and CAAs)

——————————————————————————-

­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­Total number of students enrolled during testing window

*The CDE uses whole number rounding (example: 94.1% rounds up to 95%)

 

The testing window begins when the first student at the school logs on to take either the CAT or PT of the SBAC in ELA or math or the CAA. The end of the testing window

Make sure to test any students who transfer in during the testing window, although you’re not responsible for testing students who transfer in during the last 14 days of the testing window. You’re also responsible for testing any students who transfer out during the testing window provided they don’t transfer out during the first 14 days of the testing window.

To monitor your testing progress in TOMS, have an LEA-level user generate the Test Completion Rate Report. You can export the report to Excel to total the “Total Student Completed” column across grade levels for each subject area. Separately, based on your enrollment in CALPADS, calculate the total students needed to test at your school in order to reach a 94.1% participation rate. Check that the total from the Test Completion Rate report is above your estimated total. Note: The “Total Student” column in the report includes students with medical exemptions but not students with parent waivers, so that total and the “Percent Completed” column can be misleading in relation to the participation rate.

Where can I check my school’s 2019 participation rates?

EdTec’s data specialists put together a tool that makes it easy for any school to check their 2019 participation rates. Click here to review your 2019 participation rates for ELA and math, schoolwide and for each student group. Take note of any student groups that had a participation rate below 95%. And begin communicating the importance of meeting the 95% participation rate with your students and families now to ensure a successful round of testing in Spring 2020!